Cool Classes

From College8CoreWiki

Please send your suggestions to mailto:pmmckerc@ucsc.edu You can get more info by searching instructor, course number or title.

NEW Sustainability Minor!

The Global Food Initiative’s Experiential Learning subcommittee has produced a directory of UC experiential learning courses and programs 3/16.

See also Global Information and Social Enterprise Studies includes technology and social justice. Link. Contact Leah Lampa, GIIP fellow llampa (at) ucsc.edu.

See also the Sustainability Office list of green classes.

Natural History Club has list of UCSC classes.

Note: Often the classes listed below will repeat.


Winter 2017

Classes in Rachel Carson’s Sustainability Studies Minor are open to all UCSC continuing and transfer students from all majors.

CRSN 151A (5 units), TT 3:20-4:55: Sustainability Practicum in the Built Environment CRSN 152-01(2 units), W 5:20-6:55, IDEASS Laboratory Practicum CRSN 152-02(2 units), F 2:40-5:05, Sustainable Urban Food Initiative CRSN 152-03(2 units), Th, 1:30-3:05, Tiny House Design Lab

ESLP: The Education for Sustainable Living Program (ESLP) is a collaborative interdisciplinary effort to realize sustainable community throughout the University of California. Students participate in a weekly speaker series and form Action Research Teams (ARTs) in partnership with guest lecturers, faculty, administration, and community members to implement tangible change.

CRSN 90 - 01 Garden Internship Class Number: 41016 Instructor: Monsen,K.L.Location: SEM: TBADay and Time: TBA To Be Arranged 15 of 15

CRSN 122 - 01 UN-Contemporary Issues Class Number: 43273 Instructor: Robertson,D.Location: SEM: Kresge Clrm 327Day and Time: M 05:20PM-06:55PM

CRSN 151A - 01 Sustain Praxis Class Number: 43107 Instructor: Lipschutz,R.D. Bell,K.W.Location: LEC: Soc Sci 2 159Day and Time: TuTh 03:20PM-04:55PM

CRSN 152 - 01 IDEASS Lab Class Number: 43113 Instructor: Ball,T.B.Location: LAB: Porter Acad 246Day and Time: MW 05:20PM-06:55PM

CRSN 152 - 02 IDEASS Lab Class Number: 43114 Instructor: Bell,K.W.Location: LAB: Oakes Acad 103Day and Time: F 02:40PM-05:05PM

CRSN 152 - 03 IDEASS Lab Class Number: 43115 Instructor: Rettenwender,T.Location: LAB: Oakes Acad 101Day and Time: Th 01:30PM-03:05PM

CRSN 152 - 04 IDEASS Lab Class Number: 43116 Instructor: Lipschutz,R.D.Location: LAB: Porter Acad 246Day and Time: MWF 02:40PM-03:45PM

CRSN 160 - 01 Facilitate Enviro Ed Class Number: 42787 Instructor: Lipschutz,R.D.Location: LEC: Oakes Acad 103Day and Time: TuTh 01:30PM-03:05PM

CRSN 162 - 01 Sust Int Practicum Class Number: 42906 Instructor: Lipschutz,R.D.Location: FLD: TBADay and Time: TBA To Be Arranged.

ENVS 100 - 01 Ecology and Society Class Number: 41464 Instructor: Szasz,A.Location: LEC: J Baskin Engr 152Day and Time: TuTh 01:30PM-03:05PM

ENVS 130B - 01 Sustainable Agricul Class Number: 41471 Instructor: Jimenez Soto,M.E.Location: LEC: Steven Acad 175Day and Time: TuTh 03:20PM-04:55PM

ENVS 170 - 01 Agri & Climate Chng Class Number: 42963 Instructor: Monsen,K.L.Location: LEC: PhysSciences 130Day and Time: MWF 09:20AM-10:25AM

ENVS 172 - 01 EnvRisks/PubPolicy Class Number: 41486 Instructor: Rajan,S.R.Location: SEM: R Carson Acad 250Day and Time: TuTh 08:00AM-09:35AM

ENVS 176 - 01 Disasters Class Number: 42965 Instructor: Rajan,S.R.Location: LEC: R Carson Acad 250Day and Time: TuTh 09:50AM-11:25AM


Winter 2016: 2-unit 'Navigating the Research University' course (STEV 26) will be offered on M/W from 3:30-4:40 next quarter (and spring quarter), and is open to all first-year students across the campus. For those who are unfamiliar with the class, it is designed to help first-year students better integrate into a research university. I bring in guest speakers from across campus to expose students to the wide range of resources and support services available to help them be successful, academically as well as personally. We also discuss issues around time management, study skills and more effective communication. Students who may be first in their families to attend college, or who may be mystified about how a research university works would benefit from taking the class, as would more prepared students who are trying to get a head start on learning about campus resources. Emily Murai, emurai1@ucsc.edu.


Fall 2014

EE80S (K. Monsen) “Sustainability Engineering and Design.” Topical introduction to principles and practices of sustainability engineering and ecological design with emphasis on implementation in society. Provides an understanding of basic scientific, engineering, and social principles in the design, deployment, and operation of resource-based human systems, and how they can be maintained for this and future generations. No specialized background in engineering, science, or social sciences is assumed.

CLEI 55: “Introduction to Service Learning for Sustainability.” For students enrolling in the service learning sustainability sequence. Basic introduction to principles of service learning and participatory action research, and placement in campus and community internships. Students are advised and taught by the College Provost and staff and determine the content of their internship in consultation with Provost, staff and individual supervisors (2 LD units). Available placements: the UCSC Arboretum, Campus Reserve lands, Campus Non-reserve lands, Younger Lagoon, Natural Bridges State Park, the Homeless Garden Project, the Habitat for Humanity build site; the Habitat for Humanity Restore; the Campus Farm (CASFS) and the Program in Community & Ecology (PICA).

CLEI 150A (R. Lipschutz & K. Bell): “Sustainability Praxis in the Built Environment.” Introduction to the concepts, methods and practices of research on sustainable energy, water and food production and consumption; resources surveying and assessment; building energy auditing; renewable energy systems; water supply, demand and distribution; intensive agroecology conducted at campus sites.

SOCY 30A (Fall) – Intro to Global Information and Social Enterprise Studies Here students are introduced to the world of Social Enterprise, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) for Social Innovation, and key concepts about the Information Economy and “Network Society”. The Everett Program (formerly GIIP) is a year-long, 3 part, class series (SOCY 30A/B/C) open to UCSC undergrads of all majors and years. Students are encouraged to begin the program in the Fall, but new students are accepted any quarter.

Upper Division courses (10-15 UD units):

EE 122a-b-c (M. Isaacson, Fall-Winter-Spring): “Impact Designs: Engineering and Sustainability through Student Service” (IDEASS). Year-long general capstone course focusing on planning, implementing, and evaluating interdisciplinary projects that address sustainability in the built environment in the Monterey Bay community and at UCSC. Enrollment by interview only (15 UD units).

Impact Designs: Engineering and Sustainability through Student Service (IDEASS), is a year-long (3-quarter) upper division service-learning course that is designed to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills while developing students as change agents savvy to the sustainability challenges that will define the 21st Century. Contact James Barsimantov and Tamara Ball at ideass@ucsc.edu for more information.


Summer 2014

Summer 2014 College 8 Sustainability Courses

CLEI 85a &b (5 units, Session I & II, TTh, 9:30 AM-12 PM): This two part summer session course begins with a training in the basics of the Ecological Design process and culminate with a ‘barn-raising’ construction process, converting the students’ theoretical designs into a life-size housing unit or “Pocket House” - an innovative, compact and portable housing unit fitted with appropriate technologies and fully functional with regard to the necessities of everyday life. Instructor: Thomas Rettenwender, PA

CLEI 155 (2 units, Session II, TBA): According to the National Commission on Service Learning, it is ““…a teaching and learning approach that integrates community service with academic study to enrich learning, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities.” The goal of this 2-unit internship is to introduce the concepts and practices of “service learning, “ to become familiarized with service learning opportunities on campus and in the community, and to commit to 6-8 hours per week at an internship placement. Instructor: Lindsey Collins

CLEI 163 (5 units, Session I, TBA): This course is a hands-on investigation into the emerging praxis of sustainable activism. Sustainable activism is the political and social engine of sustainable development, and a model for movements promoting a sustainable global economy. Historical anarchist, horizontalist, deep ecology, direct action, and modern feminist movements inform a sustainable perspective on building permanent political change. In addition to building a historical and theoretical perspective on sustainable activism, this course includes a practicum requirement that can be met by actively engaging with existing or emerging entrepreneurial, advocacy, or maker/hacker sustainable activist projects. Instructors: Kevin Bell & Chris Hables Gray.


Oakes 155: Social Justice and the Rise of the Environmental Movement. Instructor: Philip Longo, PhD (plongo@ucsc.edu) Summer Session 2: TuTh 09:00AM - 12:30PM Fulfills Textual Analysis (TA) GE Requirement.

This course examines the confluence of social justice and environmentalism in America in the 1960s and 1970s. These two movements transformed not only the relationships among humans in American society but also transformed the relationship between humans and the natural world. Through the reading fiction and non-fiction, we will examine how theories of social justice parallel, intersect, and influence emerging ideas about ecology and environmental justice. Topics include the environmental movement’s intersection with the counterculture and New Left, the Civil Rights movement, the American Indian Movement, the Farmworkers’ movement, as well as ecofeminism, environmental justice and systems ecology.


Spring 2014

CLEI 99-F (Spring 14): Sustainable Sculptural Building with Earth & Fiber Materials. Instructor: Philip Mirkin. This 2-unit studio class, cosponsored by College Eight and Merrill College, focuses on building and structure design using high-fibered adobes and related materials, taught by the founder and developer of Hybridadobe, Philip Mirkin, in a mostly hands-on outdoor learning method. See here.

WRIT-2-12: Creating Green TTh 10:00A-11:45A Soc Sci 2 159 Instructor: McKercher,P.M. This class is designed to work in tandem with College 8 81B below, but all College 8 students are eligible (others if space permits). Contact instructor to enroll. Course description: Despite scary environmental headlines and trendlines, people are energized by the opportunity to rethink and redesign everything. In this section, we will generate creative green solutions, especially using social entrepreneur approaches. In the process, we will investigate and make sense out of a variety of complex and often scientific environmental issues, debates, and discussions, making persuasive arguments about them through understanding rhetorical principles. Students will engage in understanding and communicating concepts in environmental science, social justice and/or engineering.

62247 CLEI 81C - 01 Designing a Sustainable Future LEC TuTh 04:00PM-05:45PM (K. Pedrotti & J. Vesecky) Introduces key technological solutions to environmental problems; discusses their underlying principles; and examines their societal dimensions. Topics include: conventional and renewable energy; emerging technologies for transportation, energy efficiency clean water; planetary engineering; and lean manufacturing.

Environment and Society in Film 62436 CLEI 82 - 01 Enviro&Soc in Film SEM W 07:00PM-10:00PM Schaefer,N. Eight Acad 250 Contact instructor to register (neil_schaefer AT yahoo.com ) or 831-466-3633 (afternoons or evenings). If you've decided you want to be a part of this seminar, please let me know that as soon as you can, and also PLEASE LET ME KNOW YOUR MAJOR(s), YOUR MINOR(s), AND YOUR YEAR at UCSC (I seek a diversity of majors and a diversity of years). If your major is undecided, then please let me know a couple of your academic interests.


College 8

60782 CLEI 10 - 01 Academic Success M 05:00PM-06:45PM Collins,L.C. Eight Acad 242

62444 CLEI 56 - 01 Sust Media Interns SEM TBA To Be Arranged Lipschutz,R.D.

62736 CLEI 61 - 01 Sustainable Living LEC M 07:00PM-10:00PM Staff Krsg Town Hall 466

62247 CLEI 81C - 01 Designing Future LEC TuTh 04:00PM-05:45PM Pedrotti,K. Vesecky,J.F. Thim Lecture 001

62436 CLEI 82 - 01 Enviro&Soc in Film SEM W 07:00PM-10:00PM Schaefer,N. Eight Acad 250

60783 CLEI 90 - 01 Garden Internship SEM Tu 04:00PM-05:00PM Lipschutz,R.D. Eight Garden.

62738 CLEI 150C - 01 Green Enterprise LEC TBA To Be Arranged Lipschutz,R.D. Bell,K.W.

62443 CLEI 155 - 01 C8 Sustain Internship FLD M 05:00PM-06:45PM Lipschutz,R.D. Eight Acad 252

62737 CLEI 161 - 01 Sustainable Living LEC M 07:00PM-10:00PM Staff Krsg Town Hall 466.


Winter Break

Eco-village Design Workshop |Weds 12/16-9| Eco-village Design Workshop: Natural Building, Sustainable Landscaping, Organic Farming. Workshop Training in:

Eco-village Planning, Native Plant Restoration, Earthbag Construction, ‘Pocket House’ Design, Grey Water System Design, Drought-tolerant Landscaping, Food Forest Cultivation, Green Remodeling, Owl Box Construction, and more !

Where: Mussey Grade Village Park - 14625 Mussey Grade Road, Ramona, California (45 miles North East of San Diego, California)

When: Mon Dec 16 - Thur Dec 19, 2013. Further Details : www.musseygradefoundation.org

UC Santa Cruz Environmental Studies Internship credit available.

Contact us for details at info AT realitree.org or phone 831-920-8333.


Winter 2014

42107 WRIT-2-12: Creating Green TTh 10:00A-11:45A Hum & Soc Sci 350 Instructor: McKercher,P.M. This class is designed to work in tandem with College 8 81B below, but all College 8 students are eligible (others if space permits). Contact instructor to enroll. Course description: Despite scary environmental headlines and trendlines, people are energized by the opportunity to rethink and redesign everything. In this section, we will generate creative green solutions, especially using social entrepreneur approaches. In the process, we will investigate and make sense out of a variety of complex and often scientific environmental issues, debates, and discussions, making persuasive arguments about them through understanding rhetorical principles. Students will engage in understanding and communicating concepts in environmental science, social justice and/or engineering.


CLEI 81B/EART 81B (L. Fox & P. Chuang, Winter) “Fundamentals of Environmental Science.” Addresses major issues in physical and biological environmental sciences and provides tools to critically evaluate, debate, and make informed choices regarding one's own impact on the environment. Topics include: climate change, water resources, air pollution, evolution, ecology (from populations to ecosystems), and conservation. Quantitative problem solving is an integral part of this course.

Spring 2014: CLEI 81C/EE 81C (K. Pedrotti & J. Vesecky, Spring) “Designing a Sustainable Future.” Introduces key technological solutions to environmental problems; discusses their underlying principles; and examines their societal dimensions. Topics include: conventional and renewable energy; emerging technologies for transportation, energy efficiency clean water; planetary engineering; and lean manufacturing.

If you are interested in pursuing the forthcoming College Eight Minor in Sustainability Studies, there are two other Spring 2014 courses that may be of interest and can count toward the minor:

PHYS 2 (S. Carter, D. Smith, Spring) “Elementary Physics of Energy.” The physics of energy developed in a course accessible to non-science majors as well as science majors. Fundamental principles and elementary calculations, at the level of basic algebra, developed and applied to the understanding of the physics of energy. Topics include fossil fuels, renewable energy, solar cells and waste energy, waste-energy recovery, nuclear power, and global greenhouse effects.

EE80J (M. Isaacson; Spring): “Renewable Energy Sources.” Introduction to and advanced concepts in energy storage and conversion with special emphasis on renewable sources. Fundamental energy conversion limits based on physics and existing material properties. Various sources, such as solar, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and fuel cells described. Cost-benefit analysis of different alternative sources performed, and key roadblocks for large-scale implementation examined. Latest research on solar cells and applications of nanotechnology on energy conversion and storage introduced.


42109 WRIT-2-14 Climate Change, Biodiversity, and the Environment Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 04:00P-05:45P Eight Acad 252 Instructor: Terhaar,T.L.

42110 WRIT-2-15 Climate Change, Biodiversity, and the Environment Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 06:00P-07:45P Eight Acad 252 Instructor: Terhaar,T.L.

Other Writing 2's also have green focus for example, food.

Stevenson 26: Navigating the Research University Tu/Th 6-7 pm. As a first-year student, do you often feel lost at UCSC, as though you do not know what your broader purpose is, or that of the university? Are you unsure of what you Want to major in, what career you want to pursue or what your future looks like overall? Do you often have questions about the university that often go unanswered? Do you often feel like other UCSC students are more confident or prepared for university life, as if they know some ‘secrets to success’ that you don’t?

If you have thought about or answered ‘yes’ to any of the above questions, this course is designed for you! In this course, we will be taking an ‘inside look’ to the mechanisms of the research university. We will look specifically at the organizations, people and processes that make up UCSC. By doing so, We hope to help you discover (or better understand) your role as an undergraduate student .in a research university, and help you take advantage of the numerous opportunities that are available to you. Instructor: Emily Murai E-mail: cmurail@ucsc.cdu


Summer 2014

Conservation Scholars Link Apply by January31,2014. Join a diverse, committed, and exciting group of students from around the country on an 8-week journey from the urban jungle to the old growth forest and back. Paid internship.


Summer 2013

Session Two: July 29 to August 30 DANM 135 Kinematics: Motion and Machine Art Derek Franz (DANM '13) Explores the history of machines, including animatronic puppetry, balance mobiles, light compositions, logic and mechanical art, interactive sculpture, and resonance cymatics. Students utilize automation techniques to create art projects. Discussion of technological advances in the field of kinetic art and its impact on society. Satisfies GE PE-T.


Spring 2013

EE80J: Renewable Energy Sources, TTh 10-11:45. No prereqs; taught in conjunction with EE180J (GE codes: PE-E, T2-Natural Sciences)

CLEI 81C Designing the Future, (formerly Technological Innovation and Environmental Challenges), taught by Ken Pedrotti, Professor and Chair of Electrical Engineering and John Vesecky, Professor of Electrical Engineering. This course explores the critical issues of energy (fossil fuels, bio-fuels, nuclear), and investigates solutions in terms of finding greater efficency in transportation, manufacturing and everyday life. TTh 4-5:45 Stevenson 175. No prerequisites (GE codes: SI, T-2 Natural Sciences)

NOTE: If at all possible, students in 81B or 81C should sign up for Wr 2 sections that are linked to those classes.

Mc Kercher,P.M. 61894 WRIT-2-15 TTh 12:00P-01:45P Eight Acad 252 Spring 2013

WRIT-2 Rhetoric & Inquiry Instructor: McKercher,P.M. pmmckerc@ucsc.edu
Gaia's Revenge

This class is designed for those taking the College 8 Core 81C course, Designing the Future, which will explore climate and ecosystems. We will investigate how to find and make sense out of a variety of readings related to environmental issues and make persuasive arguments about them through understanding rhetorical principles. Students will engage in understanding and communicating concepts in environmental science, including communicating in different media for a variety of audiences and purposes. As in every Writing 2 course, students in this class will write several substantive essays, including a final research project. Ideally, the final project will be a collaborative group project on a subject that will be the topic of the 81C culminating project, a creative green entrepreneurial solution to an environmental problem. (Restricted to College Eight students who are concurrently enrolled in CLEI 81C, but others welcome space permitting, contact instructor for permission code).


Education for Sustainable Living Program is a student-run organization which offers an accredited student-led course CLEI 161 & 61 every spring quarter. ESLP offers a 5-unit and a 2-unit course every Spring Quarter. Courses are open to everyone and can be found on the myucsc portal under College Eight courses as CLEI 161 and CLEI 61 respectively. The Courses are titled simply "Sustainable Living". Section topics are chosen by the student on the first day of lecture enrolled. Students who enroll early receive priority.

2 units 61817 CLEI 61 - 01 Sustainable Living LEC M 07:00PM-10:00PM Krsg Town Hall 466

5 units 61818 CLEI 161 - 01 Sustainable Living LEC M 07:00PM-10:00PM Krsg Town Hall 466.

Environment and Society in Film is a two-credit course, contact instructor (neil_schaefer AT yahoo.com). 62593 CLEI 82 - 01 Enviro&Soc in Film SEM Tu 06:30PM-09:30PM Schaefer,N. Eight Acad 301.


Navigating the Research University is being offered this spring quarter, 2013. Lecture will be held twice a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00 to 7:10 p.m. Enrollment is limited to first-year freshman. (If you are in your first year at UCSC but considered a sophomore because of the number of credits you’ve earned, please email advising@ucsc.edu). The course is listed on the Spring 2013 class listings as Stevenson 26.


Winter 2013

Introduction to Mechatronics class taught by Gabriel Elkaim, associate professor of computer engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering, ends with a competition of robots navigating through a field of asteroid obstacles while firing ping-pong balls at the enemy are among the challenges facing robotic "starships" built by UC Santa Cruz engineering students.


Winter 2012

42305 CLEI 81B - 01 FundamentalsEnvSci LEC MWF 03:30PM-04:40PM Chuang,P.Y. ClassroomUnit 001

42311 EART 81B - 01 FundamentalsEnvSci LEC MWF 03:30PM-04:40PM Chuang,P.Y.

40802 EART 121 - 01 The Atmosphere LEC MWF 11:00AM-12:30PM Chuang,P.Y. Earth&Marine D258

42241 CLEI 20G - 01 PeregrFalconsReturn SEM MW 05:00PM-06:45PM Glenn Stewart Porter Acad 148


Fall 2012

CLEI 99/199: Green Entrepreneurship & Research Developing Green Entrepreneurship” is College Eight’s education and mentoring program designed to empower students to create a more sustainable world. If our planet and society are to flourish, the organization and conduct of education, business, politics and policy must radically change. This will happen only if a new generation can apply its capabilities and imagination to changing environmentally destructive practices. Our new year-long tutorial will extend existing efforts at College Eight and across the UC Santa Cruz campus to nurture green entrepreneurs and sustainability professionals. Its goal is to provide students with the interdisciplinary skills and knowledge, complementary to their majors, to conceptualize and establish green projects, organizations and businesses.

The three-quarter sequence will introduce students to the concepts, methods and practices of conceptualizing and conducting research into sustainable energy, resources and food production, to developing green entrepreneurial capabilities and to writing business plans and grant proposal to support their projects. The sequence offers two units of academic credit in each of three quarters, followed by the opportunity to compete for a summer research award. Faculty and community mentors will teach in the classroom; research projects will be supervised by faculty, mentors and project teams from advanced courses. Orgsniozations meeting Jan 7. 4 pm in Red Room College 8. Contact: Ronnie Lipschutz (rlipsch@ucsc.edu).

Impact Designs: Engineering and Sustainability through Student Service (IDEASS), is a year-long (3-quarter) upper division service-learning course that is designed to improve science, technology, engineering and mathematics skills while developing students as change agents savvy to the sustainability challenges that will define the 21st Century.

20602 CMMU 100T - 01 Agri Food/Soc Justice SEM M 03:30PM-07:00PM Guthman,J.H.

20957 ENVS 80B - 01 Forecast Globl Warm LEC TuTh 08:00AM-09:45AM Loik,M.E.

22188 EE 80S - 01 Sustainable Engineering/Pract LEC TuTh 08:00AM-09:45AM . This course is a topical introduction to principles and practices of sustainability engineering and ecological design (SEED) defined here as the planning, development and deployment of technological and social systems and institutions that can protect the earth’s ecological systems for this and future generations. The course provides students with an understanding of basic scientific, engineering and social principles in the design, deployment, and operation of resource-based human systems, and how they can be maintained for this and future generations. No specialized background in engineering, sciences or social sciences is required, and the course is open to all students. It is a gateway course to the curriculum in Sustainability Engineering and Ecological Design (SEED). Lecture time: T Th 8-9:45, Baskin Engineering 152 Instructors: Katie Monsen (kmonsen@ucsc.edu), Ronnie Lipschutz (rlipsch@ucsc.edu), Melanie DuPuis (emdupuis@ucsc.edu), Ben Crow (bencrow@ucsc.edu). You can find the syllabus here.

21978 METX 101 - 01 Source of Pollutnts MWF 09:30AM - 10:40AM Engineer 2 194 Flegal,A.R.

Ocean Sciences courses.

The Dharma Ridge Whole Earth Institute joins UCSC Environmental Studies Fall Internship Program: Natural Building and Appropriate Technology More 9/12


Spring 2012

"Environment and Society in Film" is a two-credit course. It will meet on Wednesdays from 6pm to 9pm in College Eight room 301. Contact instructor to register (neil_schaefer AT yahoo.com ) or 831-466-3633 (afternoons or evenings). If you've decided you want to be a part of this seminar, please let me know that as soon as you can, and also PLEASE LET ME KNOW YOUR MAJOR(s), YOUR MINOR(s), AND YOUR YEAR at UCSC (I seek a diversity of majors and a diversity of years). If your major is undecided, then please let me know a couple of your academic interests. see (details)

EE178/CLEI 81C, Technological Innovation and Environmental Challenges, taught by Ken Pedrotti, Professor and Chair of Electrical Engineering and John Vesecky, Professor of Electrical Engineering. This course explores the critical issues of energy (fossil fuels, bio-fuels, nuclear), and investigates solutions in terms of finding greater efficiency in transportation, manufacturing and everyday life .

ESLP CLEI 161 The 5-unit sections for the CLEI-161 Sustainable Living Class work to form Action Research Teams (ARTs)


Gaia's Revenge Instructor: McKercher,P.M. pmmckerc@ucsc.edu

This class is designed for those taking the College 8 Core 81C/EE178 course, Fundamentals of Environmental Science, which will explore climate and ecosystems. We will investigate how to find and make sense out of a variety of readings related to environmental issues and make persuasive arguments about them through understanding rhetorical principles. Ideally, the final project will be a collaborative group project on a subject that will be the topic of the 81C culminating project, a creative solution to an environmental problem. Open to all students, space permitting. 61785 WRIT 2 - 11 Rhetoric & Inquiry TuTh 10:00AM-11:45AM Eight Acad 242

Education for Sustainable Living Program Student-run course, great guest lecturers. offers an amazing Monday night lecture series link

Master Class: Building the Sustainable Global Economy CLEI 199F-01 Explore what the new green economy looks like, and the role of business innovation in that transformation. 2 units (email balauren AT ucsc.edu for permission number) there is a possibility of expanding this to 5 units for more in depth participation Thursdays, 6:00-7:45pm, College Eight 301 Enrollment limited to 15. A preliminary syllabus is available after February 15th at Link.


Winter 2012

CMMU 194, Analysis of Field Materials; CMMu 149, Political Economy of Food and Agriculture: Examines key concepts in agrarian political economy; the historical development of the world food system; and a selection of contemporary issues related to food production, consumption, distribution, and regulation.


Slugs of the Carribbean: On Stranger Slimes: Robotic pirate "ships" built by UC Santa Cruz engineering students will face off in battle, firing ping-pong balls and ramming each other, in a free public demonstration on Wednesday, March 14, at 7 p.m. in the Baskin Engineering Auditorium (Room 101) on the UCSC campus. The event is free and open to the public. The competition is the final project for students in the Introduction to Mechatronics class taught by Gabriel Elkaim, associate professor of computer engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering. Every year, Elkaim comes up with a different challenge for his students.


Summer 2011

ENVS 159 Nature Literature UCSC Summer Session 2 5 weeks Tu/Thu 1-4:30 Instructor: Candace Calsoyas, Ph.D.

Nature writing and environmental literature is one of the strongest genres in American literature. In this course, we will read selections from the anthology American Earth and analyze how writers configure nature and the human/nature relationship. Exploring early nature essays by writers such as Thoreau and Walt Whitman, we will then look at writing as protest against environmental destruction. The reading will also include selections from The Best American Science and Nature Writing to draw on scientists' portrayal of nature and the environment. The course is writing intensive and students will write about their experiences in and with the natural world. Additionally, students critique an article on an environmental issue. Outdoor writing exercises will give students a chance to observe, reflect, and write in various environments such as remote spots on campus, the beach, and the instructor's organic Christmas tree farm. This is primarily a reading and discussion course.

Summer Field Course: The Social and Ecological Dimensions of California|6/22-7/15| Join us this summer for an exploration of California food systems. Expand your knowledge of sustainability and get your hands dirty on working farms and ranches, June 22-July 15, 2011

Join our summer field course! The Social and Ecological Dimensions of California Agrifood Systems will be taught this summer at the coastal Swanton Pacific Ranch just north of Santa Cruz, CA. An interdisciplinary, hands-on field experience, this course will be team taught and is for students who want to deepen their understanding of agriculture and food systems. Register today! at NRI

Offered jointly through New Roots Institute and CalPoly State University. Course space limited to 20 students ~ register now! The class will meet on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, with one weekend overnight field trip July 9th and 10th. Optional on-farm housing: $500/student.

Registration options:

  • UCSC students can transfer for 5 units of ENVS internship credit.
  • All other students can apply for transfer credit from CalPoly or internship credit at their home institutions.


Spring 2011

Senior Master Class: Business and the Low-Carbon Economy CLEI 199F-01 2-units (email sawalsh@ucsc.edu for permission number) Thursdays, 6:00-7:45pm, College Eight 301. Enrollment limited to 15

New course (details) CLEI 199F-2, "Environment and Society in Film" is a two-credit course, which will meet on Wednesdays from 7pm to 10pm in College Eight room 301. Contact instructor to register (neil_schaefer AT yahoo.com )

EE178/CLEI 81C, Technological Innovation and Environmental Challenges, taught by Ken Pedrotti, Professor and Chair of Electrical Engineering and John Vesecky, Professor of Electrical Engineering. This course explores the critical issues of energy (fossil fuels, bio-fuels, nuclear), and investigates solutions in terms of finding greater efficiency in transportation, manufacturing and everyday life . Students will have the opportunity to participate in a group project that will come up with its own creative solution to a real problem.


Gaia's Revenge Instructor: McKercher,P.M. pmmckerc@ucsc.edu

This class is designed for those taking the College 8 Core 81C/EE178 course, Fundamentals of Environmental Science, which will explore climate and ecosystems. We will investigate how to find and make sense out of a variety of readings related to environmental issues and make persuasive arguments about them through understanding rhetorical principles. Students will engage in understanding and communicating concepts in environmental science, including communicating in different media for a variety of audiences and purposes. As in every Writing 2 course, students in this class will write several substantive essays, including a final research project. Ideally, the final project will be a collaborative group project on a subject that will be the topic of the 81C culminating project, a creative solution to an environmental problem. To enroll, contact instructor.

Creative Writing courses with Sarah Rabkin


Winter 2011

CMPE 118 Introduction to Mechatronics class taught by Gabriel Elkaim, associate professor of computer engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering. The students work in teams to build a "droid" or robot that can act both as a bull, to "gore" the toreador by ramming it, and as a toreador, to place "banderillas" (ping-pong balls) into a target on the back of the charging bull.video. "The purpose of this project is to give students an opportunity to apply all that they have learned in the class to solve an open-ended problem," Elkaim said. Link

CLTE 105 - 01 The Making and Influencing of Nuclear Policy Explores how policy is made and influenced,using nuclear policy as a case study. Topics include: Freedom of Information Act (FOIA); legislation and rule-making; environmental impact statements (EISs); licensing and judicial proceedings; research and news media. Focuses on skills that enable citizens to impact policy. TuTh 02:00PM-03:45PM Soc Sci 1 161 Hirsch,D.O.

42348 CLEI 20G - 01 Peregrin Falcons Return SEM M 05:00PM-06:45PM Stewart,G.R. Eight Acad 240

42251 CLEI 81B - 01 FundamentalsEnvSci LEC MWF 09:30AM-10:40AM Parker,I.M. Chuang,P.Y. ClassroomUnit 001

31755 CLEI 90 - 01 Garden Internship SEM Tu 04:00PM-05:30PM Rajan,S.R. Eight Garden

43702 CLEI 160 - 01 Facilitate Enviro Ed LEC Tu 06:00PM-09:00PM Rajan,S.R. J Baskin Engr 165

43702 CLEI 160 - 01 Facilitate Enviro Ed LEC W 02:00PM-03:45PM Rajan,S.R. Eight Acad 252


Fall 2010

IDEASS is a new, year-long course designed to advance sustainability education with real-world impact while enabling students to develop as change agents. This is your chance to implement service learning projects that bring about societal and environmental change on campus and in the Monterey Bay community. As an IDEASS student, you will be trained to work in an interdisciplinary team to address technological, humanistic and societal aspects of environmental challenges in integrative ways. Science, technology, engineering and mathematics will be integral aspects of this interdisciplinary approach. Visit http://sustainability.ucsc.edu/ to complete the IDEASS application. Contact James Barsimantov and Tamara Ball at ideass@ucsc.edu for more information. Fall quarter course will be held on Mondays from 4-7 PM.

Entrepreneurship Incubator Orientation 10/5 UCSC's new Center for Entrepreneurship is a comprehensive year-long program that could result in funding and company/NGO start-up assistance.


Get involved with Education for Sustainable Living Program by facilitating an Action Research Team (ART) for College Eight Course 161. Choose a sustainability topic of your choice! Topics in the past include grassroots activism, green building, minimizing impact, greening the campus, and nature writing. Applications will be available soon! Find out more information by attending one of our meetings! - Tuesday October 26th 4:30-5:30pm (location TBD) - Wednesday October 27th 6:30-8:30 at General Gathering at College 8 Red Room - Tuesday November 5:00-6:00 (location TBD) Any more questions? Contact Annie Aguiniga at annie.aguiniga@gmail.com Deadline: November 8th, 2010


CMMU 100T - 01 Agriculture, Food, and Social Justice
ENVS 91F - 01 Community and Agroecology
ENVS 80B - 01 The Ecological Forecast for Global Warming
EE 80S - 01 Sustainability Engineering and Practice


Summer 2010

High Country Writing Retreat, July 20-24, at San Francisco State University's Sierra Nevada Field Campus on the North Yuba River--at an elevation of about 6,000 feet, within minutes of mountain hiking, lake swimming, hot-springs soaking, gold-rush historical sites, terrific birding & natural history study opportunities, and more. Food (tasty) and rustic lodging (tents with iron-frame cots and the sound of a nearby river) are very reasonably priced, and there are additional camping and B&B options nearby. Contact Sarah Rabkin srabkin AT ucsc.edu

Biology

BIOE 020C Ecology & Evolution
BIOE 107 Ecology
BIOE 108 Marine Ecology
BIOE 129 Marine Mammals

Environmental Studies

ENVS 16 Natural History of the Santa Cruz Mountains
ENVS 24 General Ecology
ENVS 25 Environmental Policy & Economics
ENVS 133-01 Agroecology Practicum
ENVS 143 Sustainable Development
ENVS 145 Green Building Design
ENVS 160 Restoration Ecology


SCIC 126 Marine Science Illustration
SCIC 128 Science Illustration in PhotoShop & Illustrator

Spring 2010

EE178/CLEI 81C, Technological Innovation and Environmental Challenges, taught by Ken Pedrotti, Professor and Chair of Electrical Engineering and John Vesecky, Professor of Electrical Engineering. This course explores the critical issues of energy (fossil fuels, bio-fuels, nuclear), and investigates solutions in terms of finding greater efficency in transportation, manufacturing and everyday life . Students will have the opportunity to participate in a group project that will come up with its own creative solution to a real problem. 10-11:45 TTh EMB 206


Gaia's Revenge 70029 WRIT-2 -12 Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 12:00P-01:45P Eight Acad 242 Instructor: McKercher,P.M. pmmckerc@ucsc.edu

This class is designed for those taking the College 8 Core 81C course, Fundamentals of Environmental Science, which will explore climate and ecosystems. We will investigate how to find and make sense out of a variety of readings related to environmental issues and make persuasive arguments about them through understanding rhetorical principles. Students will engage in understanding and communicating concepts in environmental science, including communicating in different media for a variety of audiences and purposes. As in every Writing 2 course, students in this class will write several substantive essays, including a final research project. Ideally, the final project will be a collaborative group project on a subject that will be the topic of the 81C culminating project, a creative solution to an environmental problem.

NOTE: No longer restricted to College Eight students who are concurrently enrolled in CLEI 81C.


Food Memoir Workshop: This workshop in memoir is an opportunity for students who wish to cast their struggles and triumphs with food into the stew of the country’s contemporary issues–environment, race, multiculturalism and gender. As models of this genre, you will study the memoirs of today’s foremost food writers, including Rachel Reichle and Nigel Slater, and Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. You will also study narratives by the leaders of the sustain- able food movement, including Michael Pollan and Alice Waters, and the autobiographical film The Real Dirt on Farmer John 12-1:45 on Tuesdays in Kresge 159. Preference to Kresge and College Eight students. To enroll, email: rsomers@ucsc.edu.

Nature Writing Workshops with Sarah Rabkin. also ENVS 157 Writing in the Sciences. Few spaces available: submit completed application to be considered.

Education for Sustainable Living Program Student-run course, great guest lecturers. offers an amazing Monday night lecture series link

Science and Justice Fellows Program will cross-train scientists and engineers in humanities and social sciences, and vice versa. Science and engineering students will work alongside social-science and humanities students to identify and respond when research requires attentiveness to questions of policy, ethics, and justice. [More http://www.ee.ucsc.edu/news/article?ID=1812]

EE80J: Renewable Energy Sources. See also EE180J: Advanced Renewable Energy Sources

ENVS 91F/191F Community & Agroecology (PICA) 2 unit GLIESSMAN

Environmental Studies course offerings

CMPS 80S: Spring 2010: From Software Innovation to Social Entrepreneurship


Winter 2010

56556 - CLEI 81B, Principles of Environmental Science. This 5-credit class will satisfy the IN and the Q requirement. MWF 2:00-3:10

CLEI 81B, Fundamentals of Environmental Science, taught by Ingrid Parker, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Patrick Cheung, Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences. The purpose of this course is to learn about how science works to evaluate information and make smart decisions in terms of policy and personal choices. Students will also have the opportunity to do hands-on experiential learning. Currently enrollment is limited to College Eight Frosh and Soph, but seats may be available for others.

Environmental Studies
ENVS 143 Sustainable Development BURY
ENVS 144 Blood and Oil RICHARDS (no longer offered, but available online)
ENVS 145 Green Building RETTENWENDER (includes Buckminster Fuller!)
ENVS 159 Nature Writing RABKIN


Kresge 62: Transformative Action Winter 2010, Tuesday and Thursday, 10-11:45, Kresge Town Hall Instructor: Christine King E-mail: chlking@ucsc.edu

This course reviews social change methods that have proven effective. We look at social entrepreneurs, innovators, and visionaries who are conceiving new methods of solving society’s problems. We examine traditional methods of activism and an approach to nonviolent social change called “transformative action.” Inspired by Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day, Cesar Chavez, and many others, Transformative Action calls for: courage to break the silence that surrounds injustice, patience for the arduous yet ultimately liberating work of building an inclusive movement, imagination to refrain from “us vs. them” strategies that only flame our social problems, and inspiration to envision new solutions to common challenges.


Fall '09

CLTE 91: Intro to Nuclear Policy: Weds 5-6:45 Social Science 2, Rm 179 (contact Daniel Hirsch dohirsch@ucsc.edu 336-8006)

EE 80S - 01C Sustainability Engineering and Practice We 3:30PM - 4:40PM Earth&Marine B210

ENVS 292 (Fall 2009) Day and time: Wednesdays, 3: 15 - 4: 30 PM, starting September 30 Venue: College Eight Provost's Office

Topic: How do qualitative social scientists think and work? We will discuss the nuts and bolts of how scholars put together monographs and books. I will lead off with a couple of lectures on how I have approached my own research projects. We will then read Steve Pyne's brilliant new book on how to write nonfiction, and the proceed to disassemble and reassemble the work of scholars whose work are relevant to the graduate students attending the class. The last phase of the term will be devoted to discussing student projects.

Reading: Stephen J. Pyne, Voice and Vision: A Guide to Writing History and Other Serious Nonfiction. Harvard University Press, 2009.

Who can attend: Any graduate student who shows up for the first session, on September 30, at 3: 15, at College Eight.

CMMU 80B - Civil Rights Movement: Grassroots Change and American Society


Summer '09


BIOE 129 - Biology of Marine Mammals

BIOE 140 - Behavioral Ecology

EART 1 - Oceanography

EART 6 - Concepts in Environmentalism

EE 80J - Renewable Energy Sources

EE 181J - Renewable Energy Sources in Practice

ENVS 106A - Natural History of Birds

ENVS 143 - Sustainable Development: Economy, Policy, and Environment

ENVS 175 - Biotechnology: Social and Environmental Dimensions taught by Dustin Mulvaney

WRIT 103 - Rhetoric of the Natural Sciences taught by Joy Hagen


Spring '09

EE 80J: Renewable Energy Sources

Introduction to energy storage conversion with special emphasis on renewable sources. Fundamental energy conversion limits based on physics and existing material properties. Various sources, such as solar, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and fuel cells described. Cost-benefit analysis of different alternative sources performed, and key roadblocks for large-scale implementation examined. Latest research on solar cells and applications of nanotechnology on energy conversion and storage introduced. (General Education Code(s): T2-Natural Sciences.) A. Shakouri [1] Link


NATURE NOTES and SKETCHES

Saturday, May 16

Science illustration captivates viewers with its stunning beauty. At the heart of its appeal lies the illustrator’s enthusiastic attentiveness to the natural world—an outlook anyone can attain. This workshop introduces tools for capturing the colors, shapes, and stories of a day outdoors. Instructor recommends viewing the museum’s Illustrating Nature exhibit before and/or after the workshop. For age 14 and up; families and beginners welcome. SANTA CRUZ MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, East Cliff Drive Link email: programs@santacruzmuseums.org 831-420-6115 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 831-420-6115 end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 831-420-6115 end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 831-420-6115 end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 831-420-6115 end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 831-420-6115 end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 831-420-6115 end_of_the_skype_highlighting begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 831-420-6115 end_of_the_skype_highlighting. Other writing workshops offered by Sarah Rabkin, many as part of nature retreats.


Winter '09

CLNI 85: Global Action College Nine’s 2-credit class, taught in Winter quarter by your student peers.

Peregrine Falcons Return CLEI 20G Mon 5 pm College Eight Room 242. Learn how UCSC helped save these falcons and participate in the program. Class prepares student for Spring or Summer internships. Contact: Glenn Stewart [mailto: gstewart@ucsc.edu] More info


CLEI 20F - Justice on Earth 01-SEM(42524) TuTh 4:00PM - 5:30PM Eight Acad 252 Joy Pehlke


SOCY 179 - Nature, Poverty, and Progress: Dilemmas of Development and Environment 01-LEC(44310) TuTh 2:00PM - 3:45PM Earth&Marine B206 Ben Crow


CLEI 90 - College Eight Garden Internship 01-SEM(33019) Tu 4:00PM - 5:30PM Eight Garden Candace Calsoyas


CLEI 170C - Law and Politics in California: Fundamental Perspectives and Current Controversies 01-SEM(43350)

Nature Literature ENVS 01-SEM(44493) TuTh 10:00AM - 11:45AM ISB 221 Sarah Rabkin


Community and Agroecology ENVS 91F 01-SEM(41802) Th 4:00PM - 7:00PM Lower Quarry Sarah Rabkin


An Introduction to World Environmental History ENVS 173 -01-LEC(45158) TuTh 6:00PM - 7:45PM ISB 221 Staff


EART 107 - Remote Sensing of the Environment 01-LEC(34396) TuTh 12:00PM - 1:45PM Earth&Marine B210 Eli Silver


Writing 2 41865 Section 01& 2 Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 10:00AM-11:45AM Hum & Soc Sci 350 Instructor: Archimedes, S. The Consumer Society

What does it mean to be living in a consumer society? Does consumerism encourage us to be greedy and materialistic or can it be creative and liberating? What effect does our seemingly bottomless desire for things have on the environment, on the well being of workers, and on our psychological health? To what extent are our desires – even our identities – shaped by advertising campaigns? Our readings will examine some of these questions and many others relating to contemporary debates about the impact of commercial culture on our lives. Through spirited discussions and reflective reading, students will be encouraged to become thoughtful critical thinkers, alive to the pleasures of writing and analysis. All students will engage in class discussions, participate in collaborative group work, write several informal papers, draft and revise several formal essays, and complete the course with a multi-stage research paper.


WRIT-2-10 also section 49 41873 Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 02:00PM-03:45PM Kresge Clrm 325 Instructor: Terhaar,T.L.

Global Warming, Biodiversity, and the Environment

Global warming threatens to change the natural and human environment. Sea levels may increase, global surface temperatures are increasing, and major weather events will very likely increase. Some of these events may be abrupt or irreversible. How will we cope with these changes?

This course allows students to explore a specific scientific issue related to a major ecological problem: global climate change and the loss of biodiversity on planet Earth. Students will select a research topic on biodiversity loss and then complete several writing assignments that navigate the process of writing a major research essay. Each student follows the same process as a scientist or policy analyst reviewing the current state of knowledge on an environmental issue. Individual writing assignments will be revised and then incorporated into the final research essay. Non-science students are particularly welcome in the class.


WRIT-2-20 41882 Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 06:00PM-07:45PM Crown Clrm 203 Instructor: Rava,A. Our Relationship to the Animal Kingdom

What is the nature of the relationship between human beings and the animal kingdom? In this composition course, we will explore the interdependence of humans and animals through critical reading and analytical writing. While animals are a vital and meaningful presence in our collective and individual lives, our attitude towards them is ambivalent and our treatment of them contradictory. We will investigate a wide variety of texts, including pieces by Frans de Waal, Jane Goodall, J.M. Coetzee, George Orwell, and Isaak Dinesen. Studying and writing about our perceptions of and relationships with animals will help us make ethical determinations about animals’ rights and welfare in human society.


WRIT-2-21 43242 Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 04:00PM-05:45PM Eight Acad 242 Instructor: Todd,J.A. Exploring the Human Place in Nature

How might people live in physical, mental, and spiritual harmony with the rest of nature? Both Euro-American and indigenous American nonfiction texts will inform our developing understanding of how we as humans can take our appropriate place within nature. Students will enhance writing and rhetorical skills while exploring such questions as these: What assumptions about the nature of nature hamper our capacity to live harmoniously within it? What's the relationship between our own bodies and that of the Earth? How can we, both as a community and individually, make positive contributions to the natural processes that support all life? Students will do extensive informal writing and will share feedback on their academic essays both outside of class and in instructor-facilitated writing groups.


WRIT-2-28 41889 Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 12:00PM-01:45PM Merrill Acad 132 Instructor: Carlstroem,C.M. The Human Predicament

In this course we will read and discuss works by writers from a variety of disciplines, all of which consider forces that shape us as humans—as a species, as members of particular cultures, and as very different individuals—considering physiological, material, historical, and personal circumstances: the raw materials of human identity. By examining the authors' purposes and strategies for effective writing, their formation of arguments, framing of subjects, use of evidence and examples, as well as stylistic choices, we will practice and refine our writing techniques while using them as inspiration for our projects. Students will write informal logs and several formal essays, including a science-oriented research paper and literature, social science, or history essays. Texts include essays by Stanford endocrinologist and baboon field researcher Robert Sapolsky, which explore the complex interplay of biology and culture in humans and other primates; a whirlwind history of the world by Jared Diamond, which examines the material foundation for disparities in nations’ standards of living; and a novel by Margaret Atwood which illustrates the disparate forces of culture, history and individuality converging in the life of an individual.


WRIT-2-32 & 33 41893 Rhetoric & Inquiry MWF 11:00AM-12:10PM Eight Acad 242 Instructor: Hagen,J.A. Understanding, Writing, and Communicating About Bioethics

By engaging in collaborative inquiry into the writing of scientists and the field of bioethics, students will develop their abilities to read critically, engage in research, and communicate complex arguments and information for a variety of audiences. Discussions, in class and in writing, will focus on questions such as: How do social contexts affect scientific writing? Do scientists have a moral responsibility to anyone? Should scientists engage social and ethical concerns? Examples of the controversial issues we will discuss—to be determined by students—include the uses and effectiveness of pesticides, stem cell research, genetically modified organisms, gene therapy, reproductive rights, animal research, medical marijuana, and the use of human subjects in research. Readings will show us how scientists, policy-makers, and others communicate in different media and to different audiences. In turn, students will write in different ways for different readers and reflect upon how our own readers and social contexts affect what we say and write, and how we choose to say it. Like those who engage in scientific inquiry and writing, students in this class will collaborate throughout the quarter on group research and writing projects.


WRIT-2-37 42419 Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 12:00PM-01:45PM Soc Sci 2 167 Instructor: Thorn,D.D. The Emerging Africa: Beyond the Four D’s

Charlayne Hunter-Gault, an award-winning American journalist who recently moved to Johannesburg, South Africa to work for NPR and CNN, stated in an October 2006 interview that Americans “aren’t getting the information they need to understand Africa. . . . If all you hear about is hunger, drought, disease and conflict, people conclude that Africa’s problems are intractable and that nothing in Africa ever changes.” In this course, we will examine two pervading notions of Africa as a lost continent: first, that Africa is lost from our view, or as in Hunter-Gault’s criticism of American media, only partially—and usually negatively—viewed; Second, that Africa is somehow hopelessly lost due to what she calls “the four d’s. . . . death, disease, disaster and despair.” In this composition course, we will examine these "four d’s," but we will also strive to discover, through research, critical reading, and analytical writing, other more complex and balanced visions of an Africa emerging into our view. We will research varied texts—literary, visual, travel, historical, political, cultural, scholarly—to find a new set of “d’s” of our own, with the intention of composing original, informative, and elegantly written essays. Goals of this course include helping you become a discerning reader, an incisive thinker, and an assured and effective writer capable of participating in the scholarly discourse of the university. The course will encourage you to create new strategies for generating and supporting ideas, improve your skill and confidence as a researcher and writer, and expand your understanding of the writing process through active revision—all while you articulate your own emerging knowledge of this enigmatic continent.


WRIT-2-45 & 46 44355 Rhetoric & Inquiry TTh 04:00PM-05:45PM Kresge Clrm 323 Instructor: Somers,R.E. The Meaning of Food

A food movement of national proportion has heated up in our own backyard, involving a network of activists, farmers, farm workers, entrepreneurs, and consumers. The course examines the myriad current debates between the fast food and organic food industries, agribusiness and sustainable farming, ending on a savory note as we examine the reasons for today’s piqued interest in farmers’ markets, celebrity chefs, and Slow Food. While studying both popular and scholarly works, including such giants of food writing as Michael Pollan, Marion Nestle and celebrity restaurateur and activist Alice Waters, students are asked to consider how food shapes culture and how they, as consumers, affect this paradigm. With whetted appetites, students will experiment with a rich menu of writing genres, beginning with a food memoir. Assignments also include an analysis of contemporary texts, food reviews, and a research paper on a food-related topic of the student’s choice. To avail ourselves of the opportunities on campus and within the Santa Cruz community, we will also visit a Farmers Market and the UCSC Farm. The course uses a reader and one text—Michael Pollan’s The Omnivore’s Dilemma.


Fall

EE 80S Sustainability Engineering (open to all) Shakouri

Blood and Oil 01-LEC(23940) ENVS 144 TuTh 2:00PM - 3:45PM J Baskin Engr 152 Alan Richards 09/25/2008 - 12/05/2008


ENVS 80B - The Ecological Forecast for Global Warming 01-LEC(21138) TuTh 10:00AM - 11:45AM J Baskin Engr 152 Michael Loik 09/25/2008 - 12/05/2008


CLTE 91 Intro to Nuclear Policy Weds 5-6:45 Soc Sci II Rm 179 dohirsch@ucsc.edu


Periodic

SOCY-185 - Environmental Inequality

Sociology of Water (A. Szasz)

SOC 115 Collaborative Design for Sustainable Technology with Melanie DuPuis

Education for Sustainable Living Program Student-run course, great guest lecturers. Appears to be offered in Spring, mostly.

CMPS 80J: Technology Targeted at Social Issues

UC and the Bomb Student-run course. City on the Hill article UCB syllabus with readings

EE 80J: Renewable Energy Sources (Typically Spring)

Introduction to energy storage conversion with special emphasis on renewable sources. Fundamental energy conversion limits based on physics and existing material properties. Various sources, such as solar, wind, hydropower, geothermal, and fuel cells described. Cost-benefit analysis of different alternative sources performed, and key roadblocks for large-scale implementation examined. Latest research on solar cells and applications of nanotechnology on energy conversion and storage introduced. (General Education Code(s): T2-Natural Sciences.) A. Shakouri


Summer 2008

History of Santa Cruz Mountains

Natural History of Birds

Sustainable Development

Political Ecology and Social Change: Natural Resources, Energy and Agro-Food Systems (ENVS 158-01 #71622) 7/28-8/29 9-12 TTh UCSC Extension Moffet Field. Dustin Mulvaney dustin.mulvaney@gmail.com email to get syllabus